Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Force2016 Conference

Posted on December 1st, 2015 in News & Events, Uncategorized | No Comments »

Hello NIF/SciCrunch Community! See below for important information on the upcoming Force 11 Conference.

“Force2016 Conference
Dates: Preconference: April 17, 201; Main conference: April 18-19, 2016
Venue: Portland, Oregon
Hashtag: #Force2016
Site: www.force2016.org
Chair: Melissa Haendel
Program Chairs: Susanna Sansone and Nicole Vasilevsky

The FORCE2016 Research Communication and e-Scholarship Conference brings together a diverse group of people interested in changing the way scholarly and scientific information is communicated and shared. Join us in Portland if you are passionate about transforming research processes and scholarly communication in support of maximizing accessibility and efficiency. Keynote speakers include John Brownstein (Harvard Medical School), Cassidy Sugimoto (Indiana University), Phil Bourne (NIH) and the Alan Alda Institute for Communicating Science.

Who is it for? Scholars, researchers, librarians, data managers, grant administrators, funders, publishers, editors, societies and anyone else interested in scholarly communications

What is Force11? FORCE11 is a grass-roots organization that aims to improve knowledge creation and sharing by encouraging better use of new technologies by working across disciplines, roles and sectors. Everyone is welcome to join Force11 and participate in a variety of working groups, task teams and pilot projects.

SUBMIT ABSTRACTS: Posters, Demos, Sessions at this form here.

Sessions descriptions:
No see, no touch traps: still struggling to escape or free at last? – Open Access let the world first see (access), and then use (license) research content. But access doesn’t stop at the point of reading.
Starting off on the right foot with data management – Calling for participants to argue positions on data sharing
Data by the people, for the people – Ethical considerations for human subjects research and patient data sharing
Pitch it: innovation challenge – Give us your great ideas on how to change scholarship!
Travel Fellowship Funding – Apply Today Travel Fellowships are available for up to $1,200 for travelers within the US and Canada, and up to $2,000 for international travelers. While applications will be accepted from anyone who wishes to attend the conference and demonstrates a need for support, we especially encourage applications from student/young scholars and those from beyond North America and Europe.

SUBMIT TO HOST: Pre-conference Workshops and Meetings Sunday, 17 April 2016, is available for groups who want to meet in conjunction with the FORCE2016 conference, whether for workshops, informal or formal collaborations, or business meetings. Meetings should be related to the goals and mission of FORCE11. If you are interested in hosting a meeting at the FORCE2016 venue, please submit this form.

The NIH Common Fund Program on Stimulating Peripheral Activity to Relieve Conditions (SPARC) has released new funding opportunity announcements.

Posted on November 19th, 2015 in Uncategorized | No Comments »

Hello NIF/SciCrunch Community! Please read this message from our colleagues at the NIH Common Fund SPARC Program staff regarding new funding opportunities!
“The NIH Common Fund Program on Stimulating Peripheral Activity to Relieve Conditions (SPARC) has released new funding opportunity announcements. These RFAs solicit applications that address two separate but interrelated research foci:
Comprehensive Functional Mapping of Neuroanatomy and Neurobiology of Organs – Projects that support a full, multi-expertise approach to understanding both afferent and efferent components of nervous system control of major organ function.  These large projects will comprehensively provide data for the detailed, predictive functional and anatomical neural circuit map for neural control of medically relevant functions of a specific organ and its functionally-associated structures (for example, the bladder and associated sphincter).
January 17, 2017; March 15, 2017; May 15, 2017; July 14, 2017; September 15, 2017; November 15, 2017; January 15, 2018.
Foundational Functional Mapping of Neuroanatomy and Neurobiology of Organs – Projects that focus on filling current knowledge gaps in order to provide the foundational functional neuroanatomy and neurobiology data for major organs, potentially leading to a subsequent large Comprehensive Functional Mapping project.
SPARC is uniquely positioned to serve as a community resource that provides the broader public and private research communities with the scientific foundation necessary to pilot new and/or improved closed-loop neuromodulation devices and stimulation protocols to treat diseases and conditions through precise neural control of peripheral end-organ system function. The SPARC program is comprised of four interrelated research components with joint aims to support multidisciplinary teams of investigators to deliver detailed, predictive, functional and anatomical neural circuit maps of the innervation of multiple major internal organs in humans. These FOAs serve as part of the SPARC program’s first phase by focusing on anatomical and functional mapping using current state-of-the-art technologies. It is anticipated that the resulting projects will enable later competitive high resolution mapping projects and pre-clinical testing for new therapies.
Detailed in the FOAs, the Other Transaction (OT) mechanisms will afford the program the agility necessary to make rapid progress toward program goals. In addition, the OT mechanisms will enable the SPARC Program Manager and funded awardees to quickly and fluidly incorporate relevant breakthroughs and discoveries, engage non-funded pioneers, and establish SPARC awardee collaborations and partnerships. For more detail on the management of SPARC Other Transaction awards visit our SPARC Other Transaction page. Guidelines for these OT processes are listed within the NIH Other Transaction Award Policy Guide for the SPARC Program. This document describes the various laws, regulations, guidelines and polices to which the SPARC program will adhere.
Please contact SPARC_Biology@mail.nih.gov if you have any questions regarding these funding opportunities. In addition, please feel free to share this announcement with your colleagues.”

NIF Events at SfN

Posted on October 5th, 2015 in News & Events, Uncategorized | No Comments »

NIF Events:

Monday:

BANTER (it’s a party): NIF is one of the co-sponsors of the Banter event at SfN. Don’t miss it! @sfnbanter #sfnbanter

Location: Frontier, 1072 N. Milwaukee (Blue Line to Division)

Event Time: 9:30 PM

Tuesday:

Poster Presentation: “Bringing knowledge to data: Visualizing coverage of the neuroscience data space in the Neuroscience Information Framework” *T. GILLESPIE, A. E. BANDROWSKI, J. S. GRETHE, M. E. MARTONE

Location: Poster 544.01 at DD37, Hall A

Presentation time: 8:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Presentation and Demo: “Research Resource ID’s and Annotating the Web” by Maryann Martone

Location: INCF Booth

Presentation and Demo Time: 1:30 PM – 3:15 PM

Related Events:

Friday

Using NEURON to Model Cells and Networks 9 a.m.–5 p.m.
Saturday

Using the Neuroscience Gateway Portal (NSG) for 9–10:30 a.m.

Big Data Opportunities Using the NIMH Data Archive (NDA) 6:30–10 p.m.

 

Sunday, October 18

Neuroinformatics Social 6:45–8:45 p.m.

The NWB Neurophysiology Data Format (Alpha Version) 6:30–7:30 p.m.

 

Tuesday, October 20

Computational Neuroscience Social 6:45–8:45 p.m.

The BRAIN Initiative in 2015: Updates and Outreach Town Hall and Reception 6:30–8:30 p.m.

Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) Study

Posted on September 25th, 2015 in News & Events, Uncategorized | No Comments »

Hello NIF Community!

The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) study intends to award funding to investigators interested in analyzing interactions between environmental and genetic factors contributing to development of autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes (T1D). See below for more details!

Sincerely,

The NIF/SciCrunch Team

***

Dear All,
The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) study intends to award funding to investigators interested in analyzing interactions between environmental and genetic factors contributing to development of autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes (T1D). SNP data are available on nearly the entire TEDDY cohort. Microbiome, viral metagenomics, metabolomics, gene expression, proteomics, and dietary biomarkers data are available from the TEDDY case-control population. Additional data collected as a part of the TEDDY study include dietary intake, supplements, medications, parental education level, familial smoking habits, vaccinations, household exposures, illnesses, allergies, social groups, psychosocial stressors, life events, and more. Investigators should assemble a team that can design and conduct an analysis on the entire TEDDY cohort, the TEDDY case-control population, or both, depending on the question being addressed by the investigators.

Please see the attached RFP.

ITN ITN 16-05-MH TEDDY Data analysis final

Apply for the position of Program Manager of SPARC at NIH

Posted on June 11th, 2015 in News & Events, Uncategorized | No Comments »

Hello NIF Family!

The position for Program Manager of the Stimulating Peripheral Activity to Relieve Conditions (SPARC) program at the National Institute of Health (NIH) is available. If you think you might qualify for this position and would be interested in applying, please read the letter of notice below:

Common Fund Program Manager 
Are you a top-level Scientific Researcher seeking a career at one of the preeminent biomedical research institutes in the Nation and the world? The Program Manager (PM) of the Stimulating Peripheral Activity to Relieve Conditions (SPARC) program will use her/his research expertise to lead SPARC awardees to develop integrated functional/anatomical neural circuit map(s) in multiple organ systems, create next generation tools to accelerate research, and cultivate and maintain ongoing partnerships between the NIH, FDA, and industry.  The goal of the SPARC program is to develop proof of concept for a new class of neural control devices to precisely treat a wide variety of diseases and conditions.
 
We are looking for applicants with a commitment to scientific excellence and the energy, enthusiasm, and innovative thinking necessary to lead within a dynamic and diverse organization.  The ideal candidate would have expertise in neuroscience and/or any field of biomedical research focused on the peripheral nervous system; medical device development and associated FDA policies; fostering and working with interdisciplinary research teams; and managing and overseeing large collaborative networks involving academia, industry and/or federal government.  For the full list of qualifications, please see the official position announcement.
 
Applications will be reviewed starting July 1, 2015 and the search will be closed when a suitable candidate is identified.  More information can be found at http://www.jobs.nih.gov/vacancies/executive/oer.htm
Sincerely,
NIH Common Fund SPARC Program staff

NIF Webinar: Dr. Hongwei Dong on Macroconnectomes Feb 5th 11 am PDT

Posted on January 29th, 2013 in News & Events, Uncategorized, Webinar Announcement | No Comments »

Please join NIF for the next webinar at the crossroads of neuroscience and informatics.

Topic: The state of Macroconnectomes: what can these tell us about the nervous system?

Date/Time: February 5, 2013 – 11:00 am PDT (2:00 Eastern Time)

Presenter: Hongwei Dong

URL: http://connect.neuinfo.org/webinar

URL: Recording available

Description:
Macro-connectomes (connectivity matrices at the brain regions level) are essential for understanding the structure-functional relationships of different parts of the mammalian central nervous system. They are also the starting point in construction of functionally relevant networks with different levels of complexity.

The construction of macroconnectomes is a complex and time consuming task involving combined efforts from experimental neuroanatomists and neuroinformaticians. There is no completed macroconnectome of any species to date, but a substantial amount of rat and macaque connectivity data is already collated by several neuroinformatics groups. The advent of more sophisticated axonal tracing techniques promises rapid production of high quality experimental connectivity data in (rodent) animal models. Moreover, improved tools for visualization, sharing, and analysis of tract tracing data, will expectedly facilitate extraction of knowledge and assembly of connectome matrices from such data.

Please join us for the NIF Webinar – Dataverse Nov 27th, 11 am PDT

Posted on November 20th, 2012 in Force11, News & Events, Uncategorized, Webinar Announcement | No Comments »

Topic: The Dataverse Network
Date/Time: November 27, 2012 – 11:00 am PDT (2:00 Eastern Time)
Presenter: Merce Crosas
URL: http://connect.neuinfo.org/webinar
The Dataverse Network is an open-source repository for sharing, citing and analyzing research data developed at the Institute for Quantitative Social Science (IQSS) at Harvard University. It provides a platform for replicating previous work and helping validate science. It generates a formal persistent data citation to allow referencing a data set (and its version) from a publication. Each Dataverse in a Dataverse Network is customized and managed by a researcher or research group, while the data sets are archived in a central repository. Harvard University currently hosts a Dataverse Network fo social science data and another one for astronomy data.

How to make the most annoying biological database

Posted on November 4th, 2012 in Anita Bandrowski, Force11, Interoperability, NIFarious Ideas, Uncategorized | No Comments »

Dear biological database owners,

We have attempted to let people know how to make databases more interoperable and discoverable, but this blog takes a very different take on the idea. The ideas brought forward include making data silos, generating non-unique identifiers and my current favorite is the 44 page getting started guide.

So, what is it that you will build next?

Top 25 Search Terms at NIF from Sept. 4 – Oct. 4, 2012

Posted on October 5th, 2012 in General information, Inside NIF, News & Events, Uncategorized | No Comments »

Here are the top 25 Search Terms at NIF from Sept. 4 – Oct. 4, 2012.

1.  antibodyregistry
2.  database
3.  “DOMMINO – Database Of MacroMolecular INteractiOns”
4.  “Rhode Island Biobank”
5.  “Frontal Lobe”
6.  “Purkinje Cell”
7.  “Satellite Cell”
8.  hippocampus
9.  “Diencephalon”
10.  “Drug Related Gene Database”
11.  cerebellum
12.  “ALSA – The Australian Longitudinal Study of Ageing”
13.  “Amygdala”
14.  “Angular Gyrus”
15.  “Brainstem”
16.  “Cerebellum”
17.  “Forebrain”
18.  “Hypothalamus”
19.  “Mitral Cell”
20.  “Astrocyte”
21.  “Cingulate Cortex”
22.  “Cone Cell”
23.  “Hippocampus”
24.  “Medium Spiny Neuron”
25.  “Anterior Nucleus of the hypthalamus”

NIF Webinar – May 1, 2012 at 11:00 am PDT

Posted on April 26th, 2012 in General information, News & Events, Uncategorized, Webinar Announcement | No Comments »

Hello everyone.

Please mark your calendars.

The next NIF Webinar will be held on  Tuesday, May 1, 2012 at 11:00 am PDT.   Please join Drs. Angie Laird & Jessica Turner as they discuss the Mind Research Network and BrainMap projects.

The following is a description of the webinar:

Drs. Turner and Laird will discuss a cooperative project between the Mind Research Network and BrainMap projects to consistently gather and annotate fMRI data. Both projects represent cognitive processes using the CogPO ontology, a community standard for representing cognitive paradigms. CogPO is used because while the experimental psychology and cognitive neuroscience literature may refer to certain behavioral paradigms by name (eg. the Stroop paradigm or the Sternberg paradigm) or by function (a working memory task, a visual attention task), these paradigms can vary tremendously in the stimuli that are presented to the subject, the response expected from the subject, and the instructions given to the subject. Disentangling the various paradigms into their components may help to disentangle the complex data from fMRI experiments.

Background on BrainMap:
The BrainMap Project is developed at the Research Imaging Institute of the University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio. BrainMap was conceived in 1988 and originally developed as a web-based interface. After more than 20 years of development, BrainMap has evolved into a much broader project whose software and data have been utilized in numerous publications. BrainMap provides not only data for meta-analyses and data mining, but also distributes software and concepts for quantitative integration of neuroimaging data. The BrainMap Project is developed at the Research Imaging Institute of the University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio. BrainMap was conceived in 1988 and originally developed as a web-based interface. After more than 20 years of development, BrainMap has evolved into a much broader project whose software and data have been utilized in numerous publications. BrainMap provides not only data for meta-analyses and data mining, but also distributes software and concepts for quantitative integration of neuroimaging data.

Date and Time: Tuesday, May 1, 2012 • 11:00-12:00 PDT
Topic: Mind Research Network and BrainMap projects
Presenters: Drs. Angie Laird & Jessica Turner
URL: http://connect.neuinfo.org/webinar

Mark your calendars! See you there.

The Neuroscience Information Framework (NIF) hosts a semi-regular Tuesday Webinar series on topics focused on collaborating with NIF, getting involved in building the NIF vocabulary, using NIF portal resources, as well as other appropriate NIF topics.

NIF Communications Team
UC San Diego
3rd Floor, Atkinson Hall
9500 Gilman Drive, MC 0446
La Jolla, California 92093

858-822-0755
http://www.neuinfo.org