From our friends up the coast.

We are happy to announce a major BAMS update:

1. Data. more than 4000 connections reports collated from the primary
rat literature. The number of publicly available connectivity reports,
accessible through both BAMS and BAMS2 exceeds the 70k benchmark. Most
of the newly added reports are related to the cortico-cortical
connections in the rat. Consequently the rat cortico-cortical matrix
is better populated and is accessible through the “Connectomes” tab of
the classic BAMS menu
(http://brancusi.usc.edu/connectomes/standard_rat.php).

2. Interfaces and functionalities.
A. Many of BAMS’ users asked for a simpler method to view connections
data. Hence, we implemented an additional list view of the connections
in classic BAMS. This interface is now implemented in the “Reference”
section of BAMS (searching for information by references). A second
request from users was related to the export of data from the classic
BAMS. Consequently, the connections data retrieved by searches can be
downloaded by any user in Excel format. This new functionality was
also implemented in the “Reference” section of BAMS.
Example: the connectivity data collated from Cenquizca & Swanson,
2007: http://brancusi.usc.edu/connections/conef-det2.php?ref=1653
We will expand these two new simple tools to the other BAMS modules
and data types after feedback from users.
B. The connectivity matrices that can be constructed online allow
inspection of detailed data by clicking on their colored squares.You
can verify this for any of the matrices available at the URL:
http://brancusi.usc.edu/connectomes/standard_rat.php
C. A new functionally relevant rat brain circuitry, the connections
between the medial cortex and the amygdala, can be accessed online:
http://brancusi.usc.edu/connectomes/custom_rat.php

3. Last but not least, the presence of BAMS at the SfN Meeting 2013 is
described together with two very important neuroinformatic platforms,
NIF and NeuroLex. You can read the article at the URL:
http://sfari.org/news-and-opinion/conference-news/2013/society-for-neuroscience-2013/online-tools-sift-through-storehouses-of-brain-data